LadinoType™ FAQ

1. What is LadinoType™?
2. What LadinoType™ will do:
3. What LadinoType™ will not do:
4. What kind of formatting does LadinoType™ do?
5. How does the keyboard layout and typing system of LadinoType™ work, and how does it address exceptions and special cases?
6. How does LadinoType™ handle Hebrew words?
7. What is the LadinoType™ keyboard layout?


1. What is LadinoType™?


LadinoType™ is a system that was developed to transliterate Ladino text from Latin characters into Solitreo, Meruba, and Rashi scripts. It transliterates; it does not serve as a translator. Therefore, some knowledge of the Ladino language is needed.


Back to Top

2. What LadinoType™ will do:


LadinoType™ will allow you to write Ladino text in Latin letters, just as you normally would according to AKI YERUSHALAYIM rules of writting. LadinoType™ will then convert your text to the various Hebrew scripts. LadinoType™ is a "smart" system, which means it will automatically manipulate the text to ensure proper Hebrew writing.


Back to Top

3. What LadinoType™ will not do:


LadinoType™ will not translate your text from other languages to Ladino.


Back to Top


4. What kind of formatting does LadinoType™ do?


LadinoType™ eliminates the need to specially write Ladino in order to achieve the nuances of the Hebrew writing. For example, it will automatically use final letter forms (ie mem sofit, nun sofit, chaf sofit, etc) as well as properly treat vowels (ie aleph-yod and and aleph-vav combinations, etc) where appropriate. Additionally, it automatically addresses ladino sounds that are represented by compounds of Latin letters (for example, "ch" is automatically rendered as a gimel with rafe, "sh" is rendered as shin, etc). In all, LadinoType™ uses over 200 parameters that identify and correct issues that normally arise with transliteration, while at the same time allows for exceptions and special cases.


Back to Top

5. How does the keyboard layout and typing system of LadinoType™ work, and how does it address exceptions and special cases?


The keyboard layout used by LadinoType™ is that of the Solitreo Font created by Brian Berman. The keyboard layout is a logically sound way of assigning Hebrew characters to the QWERTY keyboard that provides a very intuitive and easy-to-learn way of entering Ladino text. It allows for natural Ladino typing but accounts for special cases such as unusual Ladino characters. The system is easy to learn and is based on 4 basic principles that combine intuition, ease of use, and logistics. The basic principles are as follows:

1. In general, the Ladino sound a Hebrew character makes corresponds to the sound of the Latin key. For example, samech is "s", dalet is "d", bet is "b", etc.

2. If a letter has two forms, such as a regular form and a sofit form, the sofit form is assigned to shift+letter. for example, mem is "m" while mem sofit is "M"; nun is "n" while nun sofit is "N".

3. If a sound is produced by a letter with a rafe, that combination is assigned both to the shift+letter of that letter as well as the sound that that combination makes. For example, gimel with rafe is assigned to "G", zayin with rafe is assigned to both Z and j (also J).

4. If a single Ladino sound is represented by more than one Hebrew letter, the more commonly used letter is the lowercase and the less commonly used is the uppercase. For example samech is "s" while shin is "S", aleph is "a" while ayin is "A", tet is "t" while tav is "T", etc.

****there are a two characters that are assigned to keys that may seem illogical. This is out of necesity to allow a place for it on the keyboard. These exceptions are tzadik (assigned to both "w" and "W"), and chet (assigned to both "x" and "X"). Chet is assigned to "x" since chet is commonly represented by "x" according to Ladino linguists such as David Bunis (See David Bunis, A Guide to Reading and Writing Judezmo, Adelantre!, Brooklyn NY, 1975).


Back to Top




6. How does LadinoType™ handle Hebrew words?


LadinoType™ is designed to transliterate the Ladino language according to Ladino orthography. While Hebrew does pervade the Ladino language, Hebrew words do need to be treated specially. With LadinoType™, the user can input Hebrew words by surrounding them with brackets "[]". This will tell the system not to apply Ladino orthography. In order to achieve proper Hebrew, the user must type the Hebrew word literally as they want it to appear. For example, if you wanted the word "Kislev" (a Hebrew month), you must apply the brackets. If you just simply write "k-i-s-l-e-v" as you would in Ladino, you will get "kuf-yod-samech-lamed-yod-vav" which is incorrect. Instead, you should write "[cslv]" which will treat it as Hebrew and will render "kaf-samech-lamed-vav" which is the correct Hebrew spelling.


Back to Top


7. What is the LadinoType™ keyboard layout?


Back to Top